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MensajeTema: Conjuctions   Miér Ene 25, 2017 10:19 pm


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MensajeTema: Re: Conjuctions   Miér Mayo 10, 2017 11:08 pm



Conjunctions


Words which connect words, phrases, clauses or sentences are called conjunctions (see "to conjoin" = join, unite). The most common ones are 'and', 'or' and 'but'. These words all have different nuances and connotations but they all help to build up meaningful relationships within a sentence.



Conjunctions

Cohesive Devices

A variety of useful English Conjunctions exists, which complete this list of the most used Cohesive Devices. Together, they can help to express a cohesive view and easy understandable and readable texts.
There are three basic types of conjunctions:

Definition

coordinating conjunctions
used to connect two independent clauses

subordinating conjunctions
used to establish the relationship between the dependent clause and the rest of the sentence

correlative conjunctions
used to join various sentence elements which are grammatically equal

Coordinating Conjunctions

Comes usually in the middle of a sentence, and a comma is used before the conjunction (unless both clauses are very short). They join individual words, phrases, and independent clauses.
Whereas coordinating conjunctions join parts of a sentence, the purpose of transitional words and phrases usually is to join two 'sentences'.

Examples:
We can draw lessons from the past, but we cannot live in it. [Lyndon B. Johnson]
The purpose of most computer languages is to lengthen your resume by a word and a comma. [Larry Wall]
And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet — are the seven coordinating conjunctions. To remember them, the acronym FANBOYS can be used.
F = for
A = and
N = nor
B = but
O = or
Y = yet
S = so

Subordinating Conjunctions

Also called subordinators, introduce a dependent clause. These adverbs that act like conjunctions are placed at the front of the clause - and a comma is needed at the end of the adverbial phrase when it precedes the main clause.
Examples:
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. [Abraham Maslow]
Some people make headlines while others make history. [Philip Elmer-DeWitt]

Conjunctions Concession
though
although
even though
while

Conjunctions Condition
if
only if
unless
until
provided that
assuming that
even if
in case (that)
lest

Conjunctions Comparison
than
rather than
whether
as much as
whereas

Conjunctions Time
after
as long as
as soon as
before
by the time
now that
once
since
till
until
when
whenever
while

Conjunctions Reason
because
since
so that
in order (that)
why
Relative Adjective
that
what
whatever
which
whichever

Relative Pronoun
who
whoever
whom
whomever
whose


Conjunctions Manner
how
as though
as if
Conjunctions Place
where
wherever

Correlative Conjunctions

They are always used in pairs and denote equality; and show the relationship between ideas expressed in different parts of a sentence - and thus make the joining tighter and more emphatic. When joining singular and plural subjects, the subject closest to the verb determines whether the verb is singular or plural.

as . . . as
just as . . . so
both . . . and
hardly . . . when
scarcely . . . when
either . . . or
neither . . . nor

if . . . then
not . . . but
what with . . . and
whether . . . or
not only . . . but also
no sooner . . . than
rather . . . than

Conjunctive Adverbs

They are often used as a linking device between ideas. They show logical relationships expressed in clauses, sentences or paragraphs.
Conjunctive adverbs are very emphatic, so they should be used sparingly.

Similar to And

also
besides
furthermore
likewise
moreover
Similar to But

however
nevertheless
nonetheless
still

conversely
instead
otherwise
rather
Similar to So

accordingly
consequently
hence
meanwhile
then
therefore
thus

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MensajeTema: Re: Conjuctions   Jue Jun 01, 2017 10:57 pm

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MensajeTema: Re: Conjuctions   Dom Jun 04, 2017 11:34 pm

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MensajeTema: Re: Conjuctions   Mar Ago 08, 2017 10:52 pm

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